How To Make Ginger Paste

If you love cooking Asian food, particularly Indian-Pakistani food, you want to know how to make ginger paste at home. Nothing beats freshly made ginger paste that can make your dish taste better than using ready-made ginger paste from the store. The bonus is it’s simple, quick, and economical to make.

ginger paste in a white bowl.

Ginger and garlic are extensively used in Indian/ Pakistani food. Due to their frequent use, they are considered a fundamental flavoring component.

Making paste or mincing fresh ginger is always better than buying ready-made ginger paste. However, I find it time-consuming if I have to do this every time I cook. So, I like doing it in bulk and keeping it in my refrigerator to use several times throughout the week. 

A small bowl of ginger paste with some root ginger in the background.

Having that prepared paste in the refrigerator is a great convenience. I can take the paste from the refrigerator and incorporate it straightaway into whatever I cook, particularly when I cook my curries, such as chicken keema curry, masoor dal, or eggplant curry

Sometimes, I freeze the ginger paste in an ice cube mold and keep the frozen cubes in a food bag. They keep well in the freezer for up to 6 weeks.

When I started making my own paste, I used to mix ginger and garlic. But now I do it separately simply because I can use either paste for all sorts of cooking. As we know, some foods only use garlic, and others use ginger only. 

What is Ginger Paste?

Ginger, also known as adrak in Urdu and Hindi, is an essential ingredient in many food recipes. 

Although there are many ways of using ginger in cooking, most cuisines use it in the form of paste. So, the raw ginger root is ground into a smooth consistency to make ginger paste. 

Ginger has a strong and unique flavor that adds heat and zest to any food. Because of its adaptability, it has become an indispensable cooking component all across the world, not only in Asian foods.

So, if you’re like me, who often uses ginger paste in your cooking, you want to start making ginger paste at home. Because the homemade paste is far superior to store-bought one. 

Advantages of Homemade Ginger Paste

  • The homemade ginger paste has no artificial ingredients, making it nutritious.
  • It is effortless to make. It takes just ten or fifteen minutes to prepare, depending on how much you want to make and whether you want to peel the ginger skin.
  • There’s no comparison to the taste and quality of any pre-packaged frozen kind. Store-bought brands frequently contain extra oils and flavor-detracting ingredients.
  • It’s easy and quick, especially if I’m already in the kitchen getting things ready.
  • Compared to store-bought paste, it is less costly and lasts longer.
Ginger paste.

Ingredients 

  • Ginger: Choose firm, smooth, and mold-free fresh organic ginger roots. You can easily find it in the produce area of supermarkets and at farmers’ markets.
  • Oil: It’s up to you. Use an oil with a neutral taste, like mild olive oil. It acts as a barrier between the past and the air, preventing bacteria from growing and keeping it from going bad.

How To Make Ginger Paste

  1. Peel and chop: Peel and chop the root ginger. Some ginger can be really clean with thin skin. So you may want to skip peeling if you like.
  2. Blend until smooth: Place the chopped ginger in the bowl of the food processor or food chopper. Blend the ginger until it turns into a smooth paste. You may have to pause and skim the sides of the bowl before blending again to ensure everything is processed smoothly.
  3. Transfer to a jar: Once you are happy with the texture of your ginger paste, transfer it into a clean, sterilized jar. 
  4. Pour oil into the jar: Pour it into the jar and let it cover the ginger paste’s surface. Put the lid on and store the jar in the refrigerator. It keeps well for 2 weeks. 
  5. For freezing: If you want to freeze the paste, add ¼ cup (60 milliliters) of water when you blend the ginger. Then, line the ice cube mold with a cling film. Spoon the ginger paste into each cube square. Press gently to ensure the cube is fully filled with the paste. Put the mold in the freezer for 2-3 hours or until the ginger is fully frozen. 
  6. Store in a freezer-friendly food bag: Take the ginger cubes off the mold and place them in a freezer-friendly food bag. Try to arrange the cubes so that it will be easy for you to pick one cube when you need it.

Tips To Store Ginger Paste

  • Refrigerating ginger paste in an airtight container will preserve its flavor and freshness. 
  • A thin coating of oil acts as a protective barrier, extending the paste’s shelf life. Use it within two weeks after it is made, or discard it if it gets mold, off flavors, or colors. If you don’t add the oil, you should use the fresh ginger paste within two days.
  • You can store ginger paste for longer by freezing it in an ice cube tray and then moving the cubes to a freezer-safe zip-top bag. One alternate way is to put the paste in a zip-top bag, spread it thinly, remove any air, and freeze it. In this manner, whenever you need it, you can simply break it into the required amount. Simple as pie!

NOTE: Label a date on the freezer before placing it in the freezer.

Tips to keep Ginger Paste Fresh for Longer

Stick to the following instructions to extend the freshness of your homemade ginger paste.

  • Keep this paste in a clean and dry glass container. Don’t use it if it’s slightly damp; it will ruin the paste.
  • Before cooking, take the necessary amount and immediately put the bag or jar back in the refrigerator or freezer. Do not leave it for an extended period of time on the counter. The paste will lose its freshness and scent after repeated thawing and freezing.
Freshly ground ginger in a small white bowl.

Variations 

I’ve noticed that some people add garlic or salt to their ginger paste. I prefer to keep things simple so that I can utilize them to make any type of food from any culture. Also, I don’t have to worry about the salt in the paste.  Thus, adding garlic or salt is entirely up to you.

How To Use Ginger Paste

Ginger paste is an easy and convenient way to infuse spicy, sweet, and warming flavor in curries, stir-fries, and desserts. One of my favorite uses is to incorporate ginger paste into tea.

If you want to get creative in the kitchen, here are some ideas for ginger paste…

  • Mixing Drinks: Ginger is a great addition to many drinks and makes a calming cup of tea if it is made without oil. You can easily mix ginger paste in your favorite drink instead of fresh ginger. This way, any ginger bits won’t move around in your drink.
  • Salad: To your favorite savory dipping sauce or salad dressing, ginger paste can add a burst of flavor. To get started, whisk in one or two spoonfuls.
  • Baked Items: Additionally, ginger paste is a great complement to baked items. It gives cakes, breads, and cookies an extra warm, spicy kick that gives them a special, mouthwatering twist.
  • Stir-fries: If you like Asian food, you should always have ginger paste for your stir-fries. 
  • Marinate: Marinating with ginger paste is an easy method to use.

A Game Changer Ingredient!

Having homemade ginger paste is a game-changer in the kitchen. This ginger paste works in any dish that calls for ginger. You’ll realize how handy having it on hand is after preparing it once; it really does make cooking much easier.

I hope this helps you save time and makes you want to cook more Asian food!

Now, go ahead and prepare this homemade ginger paste! Please rate the recipe and leave a comment to tell me what you think.

FAQ 

How Do You Make Ginger Paste Without Blender?

This recipe can be made without a blender using a mortar and pestle. First, cut the ginger into little pieces, then grind it by hand until you achieve your desired consistency.

How To Use Ginger Paste? And, How Much?

Ginger paste is used in many Asian recipes. You may use it in any dish that requires minced ginger or ginger paste. To marinade meat or make masala rubs, I even use it. I like the taste that ginger provides to any meal. Depending on the recipe, you may use 1/4 tsp to 1 tbsp.

Do You Need To Peel Ginger?

It’s up to you if you want to peel the skin. Use a spoon or peeler to remove the skin. But it doesn’t matter if you leave the skin. The ginger root’s skin is both tasty and nourishing. The flavor and texture remain the same, and the thin skin mixes in effortlessly. 

ginger paste in a white bowl.
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5 from 1 vote

How To Make Ginger Paste

If you love cooking Asian food, particularly Indian-Pakistani food, you want to know how to make ginger paste at home. Nothing beats freshly made ginger paste that can make your dish taste better than using ready-made ginger paste from the store. The bonus is it’s simple, quick, and economical to make.
Author: Devy Dar
Prep Time20 minutes
Total Time20 minutes
Course: Sundries, Vegetarian
Cuisine: Indian, Pakistani
Servings: 30 tablespoons

Equipment

  • Kitchen knife
  • Chopping board
  • Food processor or
  • Food chopper
  • Spatula
  • Sterilized jar
  • Ice cube mold
  • Cling film

Ingredients

  • 1.1 root ginger
  • 3-4 tablespoons olive oil

Instructions

  • Peel and chop the root ginger.
  • Place the chopped ginger in the bowl of the food processor or food chopper. Blend the ginger until it turns into a smooth paste. You may have to pause and skim the sides of the bowl before blending again to ensure everything is processed smoothly.
  • Once you are happy with the texture of your ginger paste, transfer it into a clean, sterilized jar.
  • Pour the oil into the jar and let it cover the ginger paste’s surface. Put the lid on and store the jar in the refrigerator. It keeps well for 2 weeks.
  • If you want to freeze the paste, add ¼ cup (60 milliliters) of water when you blend the ginger. Then, line the ice cube mold with a cling film. Spoon the ginger paste into each cube square. Press gently to ensure the cube is fully filled with the paste. Put the mold in the freezer for 2-3 hours or until the ginger is fully frozen.
  • Take the ginger cubes off the mold and place them in a freezer-friendly food bag. Try to arrange the cubes so that it will be easy for you to pick one cube when you need it.

Notes

  • The oil acts as a natural preserve. You can use different types of oil.
  • Sunflower or canola (rapeseed) oil can be good choices.
  • If you freeze the paste, you don’t need to add the oil to the ginger before freezing.

Nutrition

Calories: 13kcal | Carbohydrates: 0.05g | Protein: 0.005g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 0.2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 0.1mg | Potassium: 1mg | Fiber: 0.01g | Sugar: 0.004g | Vitamin C: 0.01mg | Calcium: 0.1mg | Iron: 0.01mg

Disclaimer

Nutritional info in this recipe is only estimate using online calculator. You should refer to it as a guide only. Please verify with your own data if you seek an accurate info.

Author: Devy Dar

Title: Food Writer, Recipe Developer, and Digital Content Creator.

Bio:

Devy Dar founded So Yummy Recipes and Drizzling Flavor to share her love of food after exploring various cultures and cuisines for more than two decades. Her mission is to help others easily recreate traditional and non-traditional food with readily available ingredients. Her works have been featured in Reader’s Digest, Al Jazeera, MSN, Yahoo, Bon Appetit, and more. 

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